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College of Engineering and Computing

Faculty and Staff

Wayne Carver

Title: Professor, Cell Biology and Anatomy
Department: School of Medicine; Biomedical Engineering
College of Engineering and Computing
Email: wayne.carver@uscmed.sc.edu
Phone: 803-216-3803
Office:

School of Medicine Bldg 1   
Room B-15   
6439 Garners Ferry Road   
Columbia, SC 29209

Headshot of Wayne Carver

Education

  • Professor, Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina, 2012-present
  • Associate Professor, Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina, 2000-2012
  • Assistant Professor, Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina, 1993-2000
  • Ph.D., Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina, 1988
  • M.S., Biology, University of South Carolina, 1985
  • B.S., Biology, University of South Carolina, Aiken, 1983

Research Overview

The ventricular wall of the heart is composed of contractile muscle cells and non-muscle cell types including fibroblasts, endothelial cells and others. These cells are interconnected and supported by an elaborate extracellular matrix. Changes in the density and organization of the extracellular matrix are known to affect cardiovascular performance and have been correlated with heart disease. For instance, excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix or fibrosis is commonly associated with hypertension and myocardial infarction. Increased accumulation of extracellular matrix as seen during fibrosis results in a “stiffer” myocardium, which alters heart function.  The extracellular matrix in the heart is produced largely by cardiac fibroblasts.

The research in Dr. Carver’s lab is focused on understanding how fibroblast behavior and gene expression are regulated in the heart. We are particularly interested in how chronic exposure to alcohol as seen during alcohol abuse results in myocardial fibrosis. Cell culture and animal models are being used to examine the regulation of fibroblasts in cardiovascular disease.

Teaching

  • MCBA D602  - Medical Microscopic Anatomy
  • HGEN 725 – Human Developmental Biology
  • BMEN 589 – Cardiovascular System: From Development to Disease

Challenge the conventional. Create the exceptional. No Limits.

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